A shrub or tree growing up to 10 m tall native to China and Japan cultivated as a hedge or windbreak, now naturalised in and around rainforest areas.

Stems and leaves are hairless. The leaves and fruit of all privet species are poisonous. The berries are a particular problem with children. Ingestion can result in severe stomach irritation, pain, vomiting and diarrhoea with occasional drowsiness.

Photo: Robert Whyte

Leaves

Entire (not toothed) opposite leaves vary in shape from egg-shaped to oval with a pointed tip and a rounded base. They are somewhat glossy and yet leathery.

Photo: Robert Whyte

Flowers

Flowers are white in branched inflorescences up to 20 cm long from spring to summer.

Photo: Robert Whyte

Fruit

Fruits are blue-black berries each containing four seeds.

Not declared in Queensland. In New South Wales it is regarded as noxious.

Photo: Robert Whyte

Fruit Closeup

This specimen was photographed on Riaweena Street The Gap, where it is widespread, sometimes in dense thickets.

Photo: Robert Whyte