Tree to 6 m, bark smooth, grey to dark grey, often more or less blotchy with lichens.

Found in warmer rainforest from the coast to the ranges, often in regrowth. Hardy, common, widespread. An important local species, food for birds and insects.

Pronounced “ghee-O-a” after J. Guio an 18th century Spanish painter of plants who illustrated botanical books; semiglauca from Latin semi (half) and glaucus (covered with a fine bloom of the colour of a cabbage leaf), referring to the under surface of the leaflets.

Photo: Robert Whyte

Leaves (discolourous)

Grey/green underleaf contrasts with the rest of the foliage – a distinctive feature

Photo: Robert Whyte

Flowers

Flowers are small white/yellowish/green in dense bunches in leaf axils or branchlet ends from September-November.

Photo: Robert Whyte

Fruit

Fruit is a 3-lobed green capsule splitting to reveal brown/black seed enclosed by an orange aril ripe January-February. Fleshy aril possibly edible like most sapinds, but avoid the cynaide collecting seeds. Relished by birds. Propagate from very fresh seed.

Photo: Robert Whyte

Juvenile

A good habitat tree as fruit is eaten by many birds. As in many Sapinds, the bark was used by Aborigines to stun fish (contains saponin).

Photo: Robert Whyte

Tubestock

It would be normal to see specimens of all ages along creekbanks where good quality dry rainforest habitat remains intact. Even degraded, partially cleared creekbanks should show signs of Guioa in regrowth.

Photo: Robert Whyte