Ashgrove Sports Ground

Enoggera Creek, St John's Wood

 

Group Coordinator: Dean Wyatt

In 2019, a new Ashgrove Sports Ground Habitat Group was formed led by Dean Wyatt.

The group works from the section of Enoggera Creek that runs along the back of Yoku Rd all the way downstream to Acacia Dr, and has been holding fornightly working bees on Sunday mornings.

For more information, please contact Dean at asg.habitat.group@gmail.com.

 

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Much of the land on the northernside of the creek is Army land which, environmentally, is in pretty good nick.

 

2005 saw a new group led by SOWN Nursery Manager Colleen Farrell take on a stretch of creek midway round the Ashgrove Sports Ground between the Bowls Club and Marist Brothers. Colleen’s site was a haven for Japanese Sunflower, Balloon Vine and Green Panic Grass.

Waterhousea floribunda by the waterside is a good sign.

Elephant’s ears (Colocasia esculenta – esculenta means edible) not so good, is also is doing fine along this bank. It will be a job for the waders.

 

One one side of the creek, at least, things are looking pretty good.

 

 

History

John Thompson began working on this site in 1996. John’s site extended from the ‘Banana’ bridge behind the bowls club, downstream on Enoggera Creek around the Ashgrove Sports Ground for some 300 metres.

A hillside to conquer

Dense weed here is protecting this bank from erosion.

A mixture

Some natural species here have been planted to create canopy. Once the canopy is established, the weeds can be removed. The remainder will die from lack of light and the suppressing action of Casuarine spp.

Steep banks

The banks of the creek here are very high, and in some places overhung.

Healthy replanting

This area shows good growth and some good remnant plants.

Japanese Sunflower

The weeds along the back of the Ashgrove are a mixture of tall shrubby species, Castor Oil Plant and Japanese Sunflower, elephant grass and other escaped pasture grasses.

Mulching

Here some mulching has been done – more is always needed.

Vines

Balloon vine, mile-a-minute, morning glory and glycine are problems here, as everywhere.